New Arrivals   -   Wishlist   -   Recently Viewed   -   Login

A pair of French early 19th century Louis XVI st. Sèvres porcelain vases, signed Jacob Petit

List: $23,800.00

A pair of French early 19th century Louis XVI st. Sèvres porcelain vases, signed Jacob Petit

List: $23,800.00

A sensation and large scaled pair of French early 19th century Louis XVI st. Sèvres porcelain vases, signed Jacob Petit. The pair are raised by a square block base with a mottled plinth and gilt trim. The front and back... — Read More

  • Item # 9471
  • H: 27.5 in L: 12.25 in D: 10.25 in

    H: 70 cm L: 31 cm D: 26 cm

  • France
  • 19th Century
  • Sèvres Porcelain
  • Louis XIV st. Read More
  • (Louis XIV st.) - Louis XIV style, also known as French Classicism, was thought of and intended to glorify the Sun King and his reign via the majesty and harmony of its style. Louis XIV's style consisted of three different time periods with French Classicism being the first and under the control of regent Anne of Austria. The second period was under the personal rule of the King and became more classical, ostentatious, and victorious, culminating in the building of the Chateau of Versailles. Later in the second phase of King Louis XIV’s reign, came the invention of marquetry which changed French furniture with the decoration of different colors and woods. Most famous for his creations during this period is André Charles Boulle.
  • Jacob Petit Read More
  • (1796-1868 Paris) French Porcelain maker, designer. Jacob Mardouché (who went by Petit, his wife’s surname) studied painting in Antoine Jean Gros’s workshop. In 1820, he earned his certification as a porcelain manufacturer. He made several journeys to Italy, Switzerland and Germany before settling down for a few years in England, where he studied various industries and painted stage sets. When most Parisian porcelain makers were creating models in the Neo-Classical style, Petit went against tradition and created in a wide variety of styles and decoration. His extravagant styles appeared when the art of the porcelain industry was falling into decline, and his success offered a boost to the decorative porcelain trade. Petit returned to France around 1830-1831 and published an important interior design collection composed of hundreds of drawings depicting models of vases, furniture, chairs, and silver and bronze objects. His tome presented a variety of previous styles, with an obvious preference for Antiquity and Gothic styles. After a short period at Sèvres, he opened a small workshop in Belleville. His success was fast and spectacular, and in 1833 he bought the porcelain factory of Baruch Weil at Fontainebleau. The factory was appreciated by Louis XVIII, Charles X and the Duchess of Berry.
    Payment Plan Option Learn More
    Choose the payment plan option at checkout and customize this payment option with our team. Payment plans are flexible and items will ship once all payments are received.

Questions About This Piece?

(561) 835-1319